Watchmen

Analysis of book:

The graphic novel by Moore is is written with sophistication, with illlustration that resemble more sketches than drawings. This highlights the adult content of the graphic novel, and the fast paced action of the novel. Often times there will be panels in which no word is being said, and the action being seen in the panel is absent or very slight. These seem to be pauses, in which readers can stop to observe the details, such as newspapers on the desk for hints and clues, or to simply observe and get used to a character. The very real and intricate sketchings represent also the very real aspects of the superheroes, and demystifies in a sense superheros. They become humans dealing with fahtomable issues, such as being a government’s pawn instead of being a wholesome, amazing being.

Analysis of movie:

Watchmen the film took on a rather politlca stance of superheroes and a very dark one at that. While humanizing the superheros, it also takes away from the pure superhero movie and definitely makes it one that tells the tale of a person’s struggle to regain him/herself. The music chosen for the film seems to be incredibly worng, oftentimes playing classical or romantic music in opposition to gory bloody scenes. This creates a heightened dramatic effect. The film strast of celebrating the bravada of superheros, as they’re dressed inspandex suits then plops them in controversial political scenarios. It is an exploration of the human condition and identities.

Analysis of adaptation:

The darkness of the graphic novel and the depiction in terms of costuming and personalities seemed to be kept very well in the adaptation. Howwever, it was much more political than expected after reading the short excerpt graphic novel. This plays up the human aspect and struggles that even superheroes, like normal human beings, have to face. Though in the graphic novel there are politlca elements, such as the infiltration of the government, there seems to be more of a racial issue presented in the film. The film itself did a good job of presenting what only a graphic novel could, which is the thematic effects and explosions.

Critical Analysis:

In the book, the cataclysm at the end is caused by a huge monster, thought to be an alien life form, exploding in New York City. In the film, the cataclysm is caused by nuclear explosions in a number of cities (all having Dr. Manhattan’s signature, making him the monster). Why the change in the film and did it improve upon the ending in the book?

The change really posits the film as much more political and real, which fits in iwth the live action filming of the film. It also humanizes the entire film, and provides it with more relatable issues to a broader audience. The graphic novel, the original approach, seems to employ deux ex machina, which can be both fun and exciting but loses its touch with reality. The use of a more political aspect of destruction grounds the viewers in their movie watching experience.

Online analysis

1.) http://www.totalfilm.com/features/exclusive-why-alan-moore-hates-comic-book-movies

Alan Moore gives answers about why Hollywood will never be able to adapt graphic novels mostly becuase their focus is on money and will insert hollywood effects in order to sell.

2.) http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2009/03/watchmen_special_effects_creat.html

This describes the process a bit of how the action was filmed, with the use of live action and motion capture with LED lights, probably like qualysis labs.

3.) http://therumpus.net/2009/03/the-rumpus-long-interview-with-zack-snyder/

Snyder describes in an interview that the movie in part evaluated pop culture and the way that society responds to fads. He says that the movie and the graphic novel had the ability to question, answer, and propose issues that are much deeper than every day questions but make the questions fun to ponder and explore, such as when is the end of the world/doomsday and whom does God pray to. Religion was also an influence in his movie, where the more grandiose the picture in front of the person the more influence it will be, and the more ready the person will be to accept or want to realize a God behind it

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Fantastic Mr. Fox

Analysis of Book:

The book by Dahl is obviously catered toward a younger crowd, incorporation rhymes and epithets. The book upfront does not seem to explore much of the adult themes, and shows the farmers as linear, simply horrendous farmers who are out to catch the fox. However, in such a short time span of four chapters already gunfire and suspense are used to draw attention to and to accelerate the pace of innocence and separation of good and evil. The story also introduces the importance of family and the self sacrificing male figure, along with the caretaker mother and dependent children, all facets of a family that is normal to modern day society.

Analysis of Movie:

The use of claymation and stop motion animation provided a medium between reality and pure animation suitable for all audiences, both the more mature and the children. Basically, it is creative as “cus”. This allows the foxes to seem human, yet retain a still savage nature of an animal such as the fox’s way of eating. Death in the film is the event that takes away the human and civilized aspect of the “wild animals of true nature and pure talents.” In the scene in whic hthe rat dies, his death becomes trivial when Mr. Fox says that he will become just another dead rat behind a Chinese restaurant. The film also focuses on family dynamics that are relateable to both children and parents, children who feel as if their parents favor another child, and parents who know they favor another or don’t know.

Analysis of adaptation:

The film keeps true to Dahl’s original content of foxes running for survival, but amps it up to be a more action packed film that has a moral to it. Instead of starting out as a family, the film really delves deep in to the family life of foxes, and thus human family dynamic as well. In dahl’s novel, the fox parents, mostly the dad, seems to love all the foxes equally. But Anderson adds in favoritism in his film and makes the little cub vie for his dad’s fatherly approval of his normalcy, and to be seen as everything that kristofferson is. It adds in a lot of violence that the book may include but still pass as innocent, since the film blatantly describes them to be violent and graphic. The theme of death is introduced but is not brushed over, rather contrasted with the need to survive. When the rat dies, that is their first brush with real death and seems to push everyone together. They do not want to die as savage, wild animals, who will be looked down upon by the humans.

Online research

1.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTHll8hULao

This interview shows how much effort was put in to creating the game of whackbat, even though it only lasted for a minute or two of the movie.

2,) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEn5SC4QoNo Murray speaks of Anderson creating Fantastic Mr. Fox and how Anderson had the uncanny ability to pay attention todetail, not only in stop motion animation but also with using his life as the story for Mr. Fox. He drew in his personal life in order to cfreate the personality of Mr. Fox. The Badger, played by Murray, had a transforming personality when Murray was interpreting the badger, mostly the accent. He speaks of how the badger pushes people to do things they didn’t know they could do. He connects to the characters to great leaders like Napolean.

3.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfXOYVmAQtw&feature=related

Jason, Ash’s voice, describes how the illustrators strung to gether 125k images and how they took 24 shots for each second of the movie in order to create the final product. The video shows the work done, the intricacy of each hair attached to the final cast of each character.

Critical Analysis

How does the film compare/contrast with Richard Linklater’s animated film A Scanner Darkly? It’s been argued that Linklater’s rotoscoping was oddly appropriate to the literary source (Philip K. Dick’s book). Is the same true ofFantastic Mr. Fox‘s animation style?

I do think that the stop animation/claymation was very appropriate for the movie. Rotoscoping provided viewers with a twisted, less clear vision, blurred even, like the minds of the drugabusers. The claymation/stopanimation provided viewers with a sense of reality but still maintained itself in fiction. It fit the theme of living and existentialism of the movie, in which the foxes are acting like humans yet still realized their wild animal side.

Alice’s Classroom (final adaptation paper)

Charles Lutwedge Dodgson, surname Lewis Carroll, never married and was very fond of children, especially girls (O’Niell, 1), perhaps most evidenced by his photograph of Alice Liddel as the Beggar-Child (Collingwood). As strange as the aforementioned may sound, it exemplifies one facet of Lewis’ teachings, that through adopting and adapting to the norm of society his fascination with children may be interpreted as a Freudian neurological, psychological disorder of some sort of pedophilia. However, explicating his story of Alice through her cycle of growth and curiosity shows that his fascination was definitely not a sexual attraction but rather a fascination with the preservation of childlike curiosity in which binaries exist in order to create a self. This idea that he had an unhealthy obsession with little girls is believed to have come from Lewis’ life being handled by “inexperienced psychologists,” who would have had “a field day analyzing Carroll’s relationship with small girls…But there is no reason to believe that his conscious affection was ever impure.” (O’Niell, 1).

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is Carroll’s soft proclamation to readers to hold on to “the simple and loving heart of her childhood,” (Carroll, chapter 12) and for those who hold on to that lesson to spread if along. It is through this, the preservation of childhood illusion and ability to produce fantasy, in a sense a heightened curiosity, that learning is the most productive. Though his story was not scripted off of a logical and analytical process in order to convey the Freudian Lacan theories of maturation and learning, it is the very example of how the binary thinking, basically the separation of self and other, works to create a harmony of self identification and a confident interior reality separated from the exterior objects.

His prologue to his tale outlines his awareness of a child’s more selfish actions for the sake of feeling an emotion in a satirical jab, describing the Liddels, Prima, Secunda (Alice Liddel, the one that the story is based on), and Tertia, with “Ah, cruel Three!” for prodding him to tell them a tale without rest. He foreshadows certain instances that will happen in Alice’s adventures, such as the smiling cat, and describe the sisters to “half believe it true” (Collingwood), pointing out both a child’s sense of growing awareness coupled with their ability to create a fantasy world of illusions. This sets up the tone of a satire, in which Carroll crafts the argument that in a way, formal and official education is actually harmful to education itself since it quells and suppresses curiosity, “kills the curiosity belonging to the culture of children” (Wah, 26), one that celebrates the fantasy and the questioning and creation of reality.

Carroll’s journey that Alice sets off on is one of education, which in turn crafts her realization of self. Once she finds her voice and can cognitively analyze objects, she can escape her fear. For example, when she begins to grow again at the end of her journey in the courtroom, and says, “You are all a bunch of cards!” (Carroll, chapter 12), she seems to have found her courage through her education and is able to assert herself, whereas prior to the trial scene, she was unsure of how to claim an identity when answering the Caterpillar. Her experiences in the exterior world, such as falling through the tunnel, shrinking, meeting strange creatures, and being compared to a serpent because of the length of her neck, all work to define her and convince her that she is not Alice, Dinah’s owner. What Carroll does is reflect to readers the journey that a child’s brain is most lively in in order to learn and create an image of self.

One proposed explanation to the sequence of events is that Alice starts in a birth tunnel, the tunnel she falls through, and ends up in the end being “socialized with mixed results” (Frey, 2). However, this explanation would eliminate the possibility of revival of the childhood pattern of curiosity. Though Alice has in a sense become socialized, it is not the end result that should be questioned but rather the process through which she came to attain socialization and identity that should be studied. There is always room to question the results, but those questions will arise from an individual’s growth and learning experience. With the proposed idea above, Alice becomes a social subject rather than a human being, which leads to the loss of innocence with knowledge. This has the potential to become the death of society, since without the existence of curiosity or vitality, a sort of neurological death occurs. This idea reflects “Freud in Beyond the Pleasure Principle that “the aim of all life is death” (Wah, 28).

A better explanation of Alice’s end result and connection with her interior self, rejecting the exterior reality, is that she started with binaries. One scene that displayed this effect well is the scene in which she half assuredly argues her existence as a serpent. This occurs right after her encounter with the Caterpillar, in which she is convinced that the physical size she is in at any given moment changes her identity during that moment, therefore her identity, her self and reality, is constantly changing. Carroll then takes her in to the classroom, in which her theory is questioned and refuted. Her neck elongates due to the mushroom, and she is mistaken for a serpent, yet she says to the Pigeon, “I’m not a serpent! I’m a little girl,” and adds to that “I have tasted eggs” (Carroll, chapter 5) which momentarily confuses her of her own identity as a human being. In this case of object-usage, in which an individual “ acknowledges the fact that the external world is separate from, and at the same time linked to, the subjective mind” (Wah, 28), Alice has the chance to realize that though a serpent exists, and her neck might look like a serpent to the Pigeon, who possesses a less analytical mind than Alice the human being, that the serpent is exterior of her identity and therefore her body. She is in the process of learning what her body is and what she herself is. The external reality, which in this case is the existence of the serpent and the Pigeon’s point of view, are fixed, as described by Winnicott (Wah, 28). What Alice must do, as she has to in the rest of her journey before she has a firmer grasp of her self and identity, is unincorporated her interior from the fixed exterior.

This goes along with another aspect of Alice’s learning process in which she learns what is wrong and why it is wrong. She begins by constantly mentioning Dinah to a number of creatures who fear cats, knowing that cats consume the creatures such as the mouse, yet continues to do so. Toward the end, however, she seems to have learned and has connected the fact that a cat exists and part of its existence is to eat mice, and that she should not mention the fact that she has tasted a lobster to the Mock Turtle and Gryphon. While learning what she herself is, a little girl, she is learning what others are and their existence as well, which hinges on the existence or absence of other creatures, such as the mouse and cat relationship.

Carroll introduces an element of rejuvenation and infinitude of the process of learning, paralleling the theme of preservation of what is forever young. He includes the scene of the baby, in which Alice is told by the moralistic Duchess, who, like most other characters, is a creature of pride and other ills of society, to take care of. This in terms of psychological growth of learning speaks to Alice’s inability still yet to separating and rejecting external influences on what she knows is right. The illustration shows Alice holding a pig, yet for a while she believes it still to be a baby, though she describes it to have an upturned nose and beady black eyes. She also notes that “ the poor little thing was snorting like a steam-engine when she caught it” (Carroll, chapter 7), yet still is unable to let go of external, or societal, influences attempting to convince her that the pig is the baby, since they genuinely believe it to be so. What this does to readers is worth exploring as well. Since the tale is obviously based in a fantasy world, in which creativity is bursting, readers depending on age can become indecisive in what they should believe. Those who have adopted the norm of reality will be quick to analyze this scene as aforementioned or perhaps see the pig as a magical pig that was a baby until it reached Alice’s arms. However, a child, who is more accepting to the unrealities, the illusions and fantasies, and is actually more prone to live in that world, might see the pig as the latter, the magical pig, and accept it to perhaps be reality.

Another relevancy of this scene is to insert the idea of curiosity in a child and the path to growth in learning and curiosity. The pig’s environment, if it had been a baby, was destructive. The people around it were linear and inflexible in their way of thinking. The cook was simply a cook and rarely uttered much, and the Duchess was viewed first as rude and obstinate, then a highly moralistic character. What these characters did to the pig (who is assumed to have been a baby before Alice touched it) was to suppress any possibility of it being able to question. Like all the other characters, who represented just one facet of society, and were not so open to questioning, a young baby in the hands of such an oppressive rule, its mother, might as well have turned in to a pig, who possesses less of a cognitive ability than humans do to perceive reality.

At the end of the novel Alice is told to have woken up from a dream and was covered in “some dead leaves that had fluttered down from the trees upon her face” instead of the cards that attacked her in the courtroom after her triumphant self-assertion. However, Carroll does not end the novel by destroying the possibility and world of fantasy created through his words, but propels it through the older sister, who wishes to stay eyes closed, though she, like the Liddels described in his prologue, only “half believed herself in Wonderland”. The novel provides an escapism away from society’s implemented process of teaching, which differs from the Tortoise who taught “the different branches of Arithmetic — Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision” (Carroll, chapter 9) for both the adults who have perhaps been taught by formal education, and for the children who crave and thrive on the education provided by the Tortoise, and Carroll’s book.

Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland explores the protagonist Alice’s journey through Wonderland, or Underland, in which she initially only accepts as a dream and has completely separated as an external reality, if it even could be considered a reality to her in the beginning. She has become a social subject, and has been shaped by society’s needs and restraints and constraints on her since the death of her father, whom she said would have laughed at her joke about codfishes being a social norm which her mother simply scorned at. What Burton takes her on is a journey to reconcile not only her own identity away from the external society of high class England, but also to be able to learn and accept with a child’s level of curiosity a fantasy world, and believe in something the polar opposite of what she has been taught. This split existence of the external world is where Alice’s vitality is restored, the vitality and energy of a child.

Hamish, her suitor who has been completely integrated and accepted the culture of high society England, or anywhere else in the world, is one of the most obvious contrasts to Alice’s still innate thirst for adventure which has been suppressed by living her years of adolescence and youth under the shadow of society. While her mother possesses the fears instilled by society, such as raising a daughter who is wanted as a wife, of raising a family who follows the social construction of “what is proper,” Hamish is the character who exists as the opposite of what her father was, the one who encouraged her and told her that all the great people are mad. Hamish questions Alice’s curiosity, and is repulsed by her fantasies of “all the men in dresses and the women in trousers” or “how it’d be like to fly,” all things that are opposite of what is accepted as normal and real in society. His sense of self is so far immersed in what the external, fixed world has defined to be real.

In Alice’s adventure, which contains a surprising amount of violence, she starts from simply going along with the actions control her because she believes it to be a dream, to taking control and deciding her own actions while all at the same time gaining confidence in her own identity. She gains her “muchness,” and is very much herself, shorn of the doubts both in terms of courage and in terms of the reality of the high-class England, and the rest of the external world itself.  The violence shakes her from her disbelief of the world and allows her to realize that it is in fact able to harm her, which anchors her in reality. Her transitional space, which is the part of the psyche that is testing reality (Wah, 25), is working on evaluating her experiences. Winnicott theorizes in order for an object to switch from existing in a person’s interior mind to existing only in their exterior reality, it must be destroyed in fantasy, much like an infant who despises the mother for not soothing all its needs, and destroys through aggression the mother in its fantasy, thus placing her outside of it. Alice in Burton’s film destroys the jabberwocky, thus in a way places it in her reality, since the jabberwocky at the time exists inside another realm, her realm that contradicts reality. She goes through the process of accepting what she believes to be a dream through the process of aggression, which is natural to human beings during growth and maturation.

Alice exhibits tendencies that may categorize her as masculine, such as her ability to lead battle, her muscle tone shown during her face off with the Bloody Red Queen, and her ability to become infiltrate the business world, which is very much the public sphere. However, the film adds a level to this in order to destruct this notion of masculinity, and equalizes gender, and pushes audiences to accept that the mentioned traits are not masculine and do not make a woman special if she possesses these traits, but rather makes her stronger. These concepts important to maturation are also explored, questioning how and why she adopted these traits, which are elucidated through her journey. Her strength and courage, her muchness, are extracted through her constant defiance toward the characters that possess a linear existence and are concerned with only certain things in life.

Alice is able to use both her knowledge and nurture of high class society with her wit and curiosity in order to defeat the red queen. On first meeting the red queen, she has enough sense to pretend her name is Um, and remains quiet and polite while at the same time scheming an escape from the red queen. Her dealing with suitors such as Hamish opened her up to the not so innocent advances of Stain, the red queen’s assistant and love interest. Stain, who embodies villainy, violence, and insincerity, is the opposite of Hamish who has become a product of society, and has learned to control his libidinal desires. Alice puts to practice what she has learned is to be a good man and completely rejects Stain.

The changing of attire emphasizes both the state she is in, whether she is with the red queen or white queen, and also the physical size of Alice. The dresses are easily manipulated, and can be quickly snipped in to a little blue dress or a larger red one, noting Alice’s constant changing identity. However, the armor at the end cannot be changed and will only fit Alice when she becomes herself, or rather, her own size. After she meets Absolem again and experiences flashbacks of herself when she was little in what she referred to as Underland, she regains her identity and realizes that the she is not in a dream, but rather actually in a tunnel leading to an abnormal world- that is, a world opposing the norms of society’s realism. When she regains her sense of purpose and muchness, of amounting to some substance of usefulness and existence, she can fit in the suit in her actual size.

The addition of Alice branching off of the normal life style of a woman in her era and becoming an explorer and business woman further develops the idea that the curiosity of a child in the process of learning can lead to bigger ideas, especially those considered mad. Burton also officially plucks Alice out of the land of childhood, while still keeping the objects of Wonderland in the reality of England, such as Absolem landing on Hamish’s shoulder or Absolem the butterfly on the ship, and places her in the adult world. She doesn’t stop her adventure in Wonderland but continues her learning and curiosity in China and other proposed countries of business trade. Alice grasps the idea of money and survival while imbuing with them her sense of child-like wonder.

Burton successfully stays true to Carroll’s unintentional exploration of a child’s psyche, and puts Alice in the same path as little Alice of Carroll’s original, but twists the world in to a darker world with more graphic violence, and stronger relationships between the characters. Whereas Carroll’s creatures were not an integral part in helping Alice through Wonderland, Alice in Burton’s world become her friends and work with her. This is perhaps to show the disparity between a child and adult’s mind, in that the child’s mind is still focused on the self, whereas Burton’s Alice who is 20 years old is more integrated with her external world, objects, experiences, and people. Both Alices, despite the differences between their interaction and relationships with the external beings, go through a learning experience to find the definition of self. Carroll’s Alice seems to be going on it for the first time, whereas Burton’s Alice has forgotten her sense of self since the death of her father.

Since the film was made with more violence and themes of love, and dangerous love at that, it seems to be catered more toward an older audience, not one that Carroll’s story was initially told to. There are elements that only an older, more experienced crowd would identify with, such as Alice’s flee from Stain and Hamish and her career path at the end of the movie, which is such an integral part of maturation and creating an identity. In this way, the adaptation differs since it seems more like a rite of passage into adulthood whereas Carroll’s, if anything, is advocating staying in a childhood state and does not explore an adulthood. In this way, Burton’s adaptation strays from the original intention and focuses more on a growth, and perhaps can even be seen to contradict Carroll’s proposed idea of blossoming one’s thoughts yet staying still innocent.

Burton uses the Caterpillar’s conversation with Alice about size to introduce the idea of blooming and blossoming in to an adult. In both the adaptation and novel, Alice compares her size change to the Caterpillar’s chrysalis formation in which he would change form and size in to a butterfly. The Caterpillar, in the novel, denies that this will affect him and accepts it as a norm of life, whereas Alice sees it as changing identities. What is portrayed in the novel then is the disparity between Alice’s definition of identity, in which the size is the only thing that matters in defining an identity, whereas for the Caterpillar it is how oneself defines one’s own self, regarding the external and exterior changes as integral to learning experience. In the movie, this changing of Absolem in to a chrysalis parallels exactly Alice’s realization of who and what she is. She “chrysalizes” mentally, and reemerges as a butterfly. The issues are different than that of the novel, in which Alice deals with finding out which creature she might be, such as her confusion of whether or not she is a serpent. In the movie, she deals with finding out what the quintessence of her existence as a human being is, and is a quest for the interior self rather than exterior shell. She still, in a faithful adaptation to Carroll’s Alice, remains herself and keeps her curiosity without changing her size, but rather grows by changing her mind through the education she receives underground in Wonderland.

Works Cited:

Collingwood, Stuart Dodgson. “The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll”. 6 March. 2004.
           Project Gutenberg. < http://www.gutenberg.org/files/11483/11483-h/11483- 
           h.htm#CHAPTER_III_T>

Frey, Charles. Griffith, Johne. “Lewis Carroll: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. 1987. The
LiteraryHeritage of Childhood.
Greenwood Press.

O’Neill, Juliana. Dr. Kent, Dr. Bart, and Dr. Raney. Logical Nonsense: The Logic within Lewis
Carroll’s Works and Life.
 8 April. 2011. <http://www.hillsdale.edu/images/userImages/
Page_7162/Juliana%20O’Neill,%20The%20Logic%20within%20Lewis%
20Carroll’s%20Works%20and%20Life.pdf>


Wah, Anna Chau Ka. “Imaginary Spaces in Children’s Fantasy Fiction: A Psychoanalytic
Reading of Lewis Carroll’s Alice Books and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials
Trilogy”. December. 2004. The HKU Scholars Pub.

Harry Potter

analysis of book:

JK Rowling creates a fantasy world that appeals to both the younger and older readers. Harry Potter Prisoner of Azkaban, like her other books in the series, places Harry in a position of antiquity even though his magical powers and world of Hogwarts makes readers imagine a grand, untouchable, forward realm. He is unable to use phones or internet and relies on owls to send mail, which is both amazing but unrealistic which is what makes it so intriguing to readers. He is also the male version of Cinderella, paying the part of the old Disney Princess except his escape is to defeat Sirius Black (who is not actually evil, but trying to defeat Voldemort’s minion).

Analysis of Movie:

The movie portrayed harry’s path to escaping the Dursey’s house in which he is seen as trash to Hogwardts and the world of wizardry where he is a legend and matters the most above other wizards. The movie took on a dark feel to represent the growing danger that Harry is facing by going back to Hogwarts and learning more about his scar and opposition to the dark forces. The dark feel of the movie, including the lighting, the music, the computer graphics of the werewolves and such, added another level to the movie that grounded the fantasy portion of the movie content. Instead of creating a movie in which lightness was the background of the magic, the darkness was more compelling and made the magic more serious, more daunting.

Analysis of movie:
The movie captured very well the situation of Harry in the Dursely’s house, and the tie of friendship between hermione, Ron, and Harry. It also does well in putting Harry in a pedestal position in the wizarding world.  The movie did differ in the audience target whether it intended to or not. The book would have been suitable for all ages, especially the younger who have a natural ability to suspend disbelief and their hold on reality. However, the movie’s darkness and action scenes seemed to cater more toward an older crowd.

Online research:

1.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgtiqfppWGw

Emma Watson describes the appeal of Prisoner of azkaban and hermione in the movie. She describes the movie as “escapism”,” which is what makes it appealing to all ages and all types of audiences since everyone once in a while wants to believe that magic is real. She describes Hermione’s growth in the movie, and how the sensitive and nurturing side of Hermionie overpowers the previously seen nerdy, annoying side. She gains her strenght and fights back when people criticize her, such as punching Malfoy.

2.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Xw_p4b3rvs

Gary Oldman and David Thewlis interview about their experience on being in Harry Potter, from how their kids reacted to knowing their fathers were in Harry Potter. Gary Oldman speaks of the dichotomy of having such a dark character in a book catered seemingly to children. Gary’s personality is also superlby contrasting to what he had to portray as Sirius Black.

3.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqUcihC6pEQ&feature=related

This behind the scenes shows bits and pieces of all aspects of the movie, from Ron and hermione trying to reject their feelings for each other to the scenes between Harry and Lupin, in which Lupin is the last connection to his parents that he seemst o have.

Critical analysis

To many critics, Alfonso Cuarón did a good job in the film in steering the Harry Potter series in a darker direction. How is Prisoner of Azkaban “dark”? And how does this relate to the growing maturity of both the main characters and the actors?

The darkness is created by the music and the lighting, and Harry’s acknowledgement of his fears and dangers he’s facing. Instead of seeing them with a wide eyed fear, he faces them and challenges what happens to him. It’s as if he is slowly shaped to expect the worst and fatal to happen to him. The movie’s dark cinematography reflects what is in Harry’s mind, whichi s becoming darker and less innocent that what he ight have been when he started at Hogwards. He is also finding a connection between him and his parents, and this path and search he goes on shows that he is more aware of his past and a need to find his past.

A Scanner Darkly

Analysis of book:

Dick’s A Scanner Darkly focuses on both the drug culture of the 1970’s and of the government’s part in propelling the culture. Though he seems to in the end pardon the drug abusers and blame more of the government, saying that the abusers were punished far too harshly for their actions, both internally/physiologically and by the government’s laws, it’s still clear that the fault remains on the abuser’s part. However, what Dick uncovers is the government’s part in helping the system of drug abuse run on, by using undercover cops who inevitably get stuck in the trade and experience the neurophagia eventually, perpetuating the drug trade while attempting to stop it. the infiltration of the government seeded paranoia in the citizens, but Dick blends that paranoia caused by the government with the paranoia caused by the drugs itself,such as jerri’s fear and delusions of bugs constnatly crawling all over him.

Analysis of movie:

linklater’s film blurs a person’s identity both by the use of rotoscoping and the scramble suit, and enhances the visual experience of audiences by creating film that seems to be moving, as if the character’s themselves have crawling skin, almost like an effect some of the drugs might have had. The rotoscoping tool creates a graphic novel type of style, which engages the audience, but also takes away from reality. It’s an almost reality type of illustration, and with rotoscoping there is room to add in animations such as the bugs, people turning in to bugs, or the alien who visisted Charlie in his room, without being too distracting from the reality of the film. However, rotoscoping also confuses identity. It may be hard to immediately tell who is who, especialyl Bob Arctor. Instead of seeing what is the normal reality and identifying the man as Keanu Reeves and understanding that he’s both Bob and Fred, the blurring and fluidity of identity and shape of people plays in to the theme of losing identity. The scramble suit does the same thing in a much more literal way- it conceals the person behind tehs uit and shows a bunch of different identities and faces. The affect this has is the realization that the being is human, but could be anything. It is not the same as wearing simply a black suit. The many different faces that flash keep the viewer of the suit guessing who it is. it also represents the fact that the government is everywhere, like Bob Arctor.

Analysis of adaptation:

Though the script did not mirror the feel of the more realistic style of writing Dick originally wrote, LInklater’s graphic novel-esque approach to the film captured the main themes of identity and government and its espionage through the stylistic choices and characters. By combining Charlie and jerrie in to one Linklater interprets Charlie’s (or rather,Jerri) psychosis and paranoia to be so bad that he becomes two people. He shifts the focus from Jerri/Charlie to Bob /Fred in the film, whereas Dick had the first chapters focus on Charlie and Donna. The shift in focus also pulls out the theme of identity and espionage, since BOb  is the directly and heavily involved in both the drug and government operations.

Online research:

1.) http://www.macalester.edu/psychology/whathap/ubnrp/split_brain/Behavior.html

This website explores the effects and cause of splitting the corpus collosum, the surgical way of splitting teh two hemispheres of the brain, and how each hemisphere takes on a will so to speak of its own. The writer cites that they are unable to talk of emotions since they are unable to make the connection between the two hemispheres, each guarding different aspects of emotions and spatial recognition. Their reality becomes hard to control, and in some cases, as described in the writing, patients cannot simultaneously perform tasks that require synchonry with the hands, such as pulling up pants with both hands at the same time.

2.) http://mindhacks.com/2006/08/14/neuropsychology-and-psychosis-in-a-scanner-darkly/

This article describes Dick’s discovery of Sperry’s discovery in the neuroscience field, that when the hemispheres are split the mind becomes independent and takes on a conscience of tis own, isolating the body it is in which was Dick’s fear for himself which propelled him to write A Scanner Darkly.

3.) http://www.philipkdickfans.com/literary-criticism/frank-views-archive/kants-noumenal-self-and-doppelganger-in-p-k-dicks-a-scanner-darkly/ This blog describes how A Scanner Darkly’s Bob Arctor is a refelction of Kant’s noumenal, or intelligble, non human experience, self, and how by using the idea of the phenomenal/noumenal self Dick and Linklater created Bob.

Critical analysis

In the film, the flower that is the main ingredient of Substance D, or “Death,” is called Mors ontologica, which translates as ontological death, or death of being. How does this flower represent the main philosophical concerns of the film?

The flower, though blue and captivating, does not have a consciousness, at least not as developed, as that of the human brain (since its brain might as well be the roots it grows from which is scientifically not as advanced, ie no neurotransmitters of firings across dendrites/etc). This represents the concerns of the film because though it is organically alive, nourishing its cells and going through kreb’s cycles and giving off Oxygen in place of cardbondioxide, it does not have its own consciousness to discern and truly understand its existence, or rather it cnanot perceive its existence relative to other living objects other than how it can live off of water, carbon dioxide, bees, etc. The effect of substance D creates this type of neuroligcal disorder in which the left and right hemispheres become separated, perhaps by destryoing the connecting corpus collosum, thereby creating independent hemispheres. What is shown in the film, book, and research is that when this happens the brain tkaes on its own reality, suchas the uncontrollable hallucinations that the characters experience. After a while, the consciousness and free thought and the ability to process information and digest it to become human experience disappears, as we see at the end at the farm. What happens then in the case of Bob/Fred is a slow progression in to this state of non-being, in which he cannot form thoughts that are truly analytical of the world around him. he eventually becomes what he “eats” (takes in, inhales etc), a vegetable, even though his two hemispheres may function ok independetly, he has lost control of his own consciousness and therefore his own identity.

Aside

No Country for Old Men

Analysis of book:

In McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, he pairs his stream of conscious style of writing with Chigur’s seemingly psychopathic, linear thought process in order to represent Chigur as someone who is truly without conscious, as if his goal in life is to annihilate life. The stylistic choice in the book is without quotation marks, which makes it harder to separate dialogue from thought or even the narrator’s (bell’s) description and conscious thought. By blending in Bell’s thoughts and Chigur’s thoughts, two seemingly disparate people, the line between good and evil people also blends. Though Chigur is obviously a hitman and kills mercilessly, he still has conversations with people, still allows for the person to have a chance at saving themselves and does not cheat that system. One character even said that he has principles. Bell’s character symbolizes lawful protection and a protector of freedom, but this blending yet again muddles the significance of this freedom, since Chigur’s thoughts can sometimes be confused to be Bell’s. The freedom that he is working to keep for the people perhaps spawned Chigur’s abilitiy and sense of entitlement to act the way he does.

Analysis of movie:

Coens’ movie parallels Moss and Chigur, the former who happened to flal in to Chigur’s path and kept at it by his natural need for money, and the latter who chooses the path to kill, in order to play up the motif of chance which is how Chigur sometimes decides a person’s fate, by coin toss. Bell, the sheriff of the town and the narrator in the beginning and end, is not mixed in to the scenes that Moss and Chigur are in perhaps to further emphasize the theme of life’s chance.

Analysis of adaptation:

Coen’s adaptation remained very faithful to the original, by keeping Chigur exactly as intended, a psychopathic yet calm, collected, and controlled hitman, and contrasting and comparing him with the other characters in order to play up the theme of how separate lives do entertwine regardless of choice. Chance is emphasized as well, beginning with the gas station man’s fortunate guess of heads to Carla jean’s decision to hand over the choice to Chigur. It is assumed that he did kill her in the end, because he checked his shoes probably for blood as he did before. This choice, then, breaks the hope that perhaps Chigur had some sense of compassion and spared her. The carcrash immediately following and the little boys’ compassion, which differed from the scene in the book, was both to show chance and compassion, a ying and yang which is pertinent to the cycle of life.

Online research:

1.) http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/2008/03/no_god_for_anton_chigurh.html

A letter promotes the idea that Chigurh is the representation of atheism and the complete reliance on the idea that life is just to surivive, that he is the product of Darwinism and survival for the fittest.

2.) http://www.culturewars.org.uk/index.php/site/article/chigurhs_coin/

Ferraiolo explores Chigurh’s coin toss and chance, noting that he grants clemency to those whocan guess correctly what is underneath the coin, but these people are the ones who happen tocross his path and do not have to do with his chasing Moss, including Carla Jean. He says to carla jean that he and the coin got to where they are the same way. Ferriaolo suggests this means by nature and nurture, by some chance and push and pull in life, but points out that Carla Jean tells Chigurh that the coin doesn’t have any say, which is right. He ends up killing her anyways. Bell ends up quitting his job as law enforcer, because he feels overmatched by the criminals, specificallyChigurh. Ferraiolo suggests that the ending dream, in which Bell describes meeting his late father, shows that Chigurh may have had a hand in reuniting them, suggesting either that Bell became one of Chigurh’s victims or that life really is up to chance.

3.)http://collider.com/entertainment/article.asp/aid/6046/cid/13/tcid/1

Javier Bardem discusses how he struggled with becoming Anton Chigurh and interpreting Anton, and whether or not there was comedy in his character.

Critical analysis

No Country for Old Men has often been discussed in terms of religious dualism, with Chigurh representing evil, and Sheriff Bell representing goodness. Do you see the film in these terms? Or do the Coen brothers undercut such strict binaries in the film?

I don’t think the Coen brothers answered this directly, but rather posed the question and made viewers more skeptical of whether or not good really overpowers the evil, Chigurh, or if it is just chance and a few choices her and there that decide how life will turn out. A car crash as big as the one Chigurh was in didn’t kill him, but evidently killed the other driver. Though audiences may have been rooting for him to die because of his villainy, he got away at the end of the movie. Bell does not appear quite as much as Moss and Chigurh do, two men who adopted chance and choice to rule over them- Moss chanced upon the money and chose to hold it despite the dangers, the Chigurh chose to follow the serial killing road and used chance to let others decide their own fates, but escapes alive from situations that should have killed him.

Harvey Pekar

Analysis of Book:

The excerpts from Pekar’s work portrayed real life rather than the usual comic book  of superheros and fantasies. The black and white illustrations that matched the description text in each frame helped to promote the idea of realism rather than escapism. Even the frames in which Harvey is drawn but is not speaking capture Harvey in a real life moment and portray what he would be in person. The stories are about himself, though not illustrated by himself, which allows the illustrator to take liberties using his own interpretation. The strips of harvey’s introduction and the ones of him in the grocery store contrast greatly in style, and give Harvey a different personality. This, however, fit in with his character- he easily fluctuated between complaining and compassion, which might give way to the great variety of illustrations of him.

Analysis of movie:

American Splendor took a twist in making a documentary on Harvey Pekar’s life. The whole movie was like an interpretation on Harvey. In moments where Harvey himself is seen speaking, he is comedic and entertaining, but the character harvey took up the more human role in which the viewers were to observe and connect through his hardships. The twist comes in further when they add in elements of graphic novelization in the film, such as the frames and adding texts throughout the live action style of film. By doing so they embody the multiple personalities that Harvey displays and becomes, even though Harvey is still pretending to play himself with the background simulating a behind the scenes moment.

Analysis of adaptation:

The film accurately depicts Harvey that is seen from the comics, who is  more one dimensional and more sad than he appears on film. The film is then an adaptation on an adaptation on harvey’s life, except the film has the ability fo include the real Harvey alongside the actor playing Harvey, the one that seems more closely related to the comic book Harvey. By using different Harveys, the directors are able to capture the essence of Harvey in real life.

online research:
1.) http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/arts/design/05pekar.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

The article written by Dave Itzkoff in the same year of Harvey’s death describes the marriage between him and Ms. Brabner, and the different portrayals of Harvey, while keeping the same tone as Harvey’s comics have taken up.  Dave mentions the strains of the marriage, including a woman named Tara who was working with Harvey. He insinuated jealousy on Ms. Brabner’s part, noting that she would pull Harvey from his phone conferencing with tara and wouldn’t let the book be published if her work was in it. dave also takes care to speak of how not jsut his fans but his wife notes that there is not one Harvey, that all his portrayals are so different, but he was known mostly for his obsessive chronicling of events in cleveland, including the time when Brabner took care of Harvey, as decribed in their book “Our Cancer Year.”

2.)  http://www.amazon.com/dp/1568580118/?tag=googhydr-20&hvadid=5470806567&ref=pd_sl_5944jkrzpx_e

The first few pages of Barner and Harvey’s collaborative work, “Our Cancer Year” which talks of Harvey’s tumor and housing issues and bumps in their marriage.

3.) http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/24/books/24pekar.html

Tara Siebel recalls the day before Pekar’s death, and how Pekar had been an inspiration to her.
Which did you find more interesting in the film: the characters as portrayed by actors, and the characters as portrayed by themselves? Why?

I found the characters portraying themselves to be more intriguing, especially after finding out that they were acting as themselves, or making an artificla scene seem real. I was fooled before reading the lecture in to thinking that Harvey was having a one on one interview sort of session, and that Toby Radolff was being poked fun at for his personality yet he played himself knowing that he was a comedy show. The characters potrayed by actors I thought were not as interesting ebcause I had already seen them in the comic books and they reflected prettyclosely to what was drawn and written.

Adaptation

Analysis of the Book:

Susan Orlean’s snippet from the Orchid Thief presents her opinion of Laroche not really through the actions she describes but more by the tone, such as her contradictions and slight sarcasm at the beginning when describing his physical appearance. As the text progresses, it becomes a little unclear how she feels about him, since veers toward admiration but still retains a distance, still retaining her journalistic professionalism as a third person in his life. She describes Laroche’s changing passions, almost satirically yet with a hint of veneration. Larcoche, however, is never given a line so readers must trust Orlean’s opinion of Laroche. This novel then begs the question of how one should trust an author, and more importantly, how much.

Analysis of Movie:

Spike Jonez’s movie Adaptation, explores the notion of fiction and the use of literary mechanics to complete a movie that focuses on seemingly real lives in order to show how real life can be like a fictional story. The movie starts off with this tone, showing how an audience member can him/herself believe in the cast as the original, but know that the actors playing them are not the characters themselves, such as Nicholas Cage playing the awkward, quiet scriptwriter real life Charles Kauffman and his twin brother Donald. Though these moments are filmed as behind the scene moments, and are made to be viewed as such, the audience still knows that Nicholas Cage is not a scriptwriter, yet Jonez emphasizes Cage as a scriptwriter. He then adds in the element of the love story between Laroche and Orlean, Or Cooper and Streep, which is also not real off screen. This element of fiction muddles the audience’s perception and perhaps initial rejection of seeing Cage as a scriptwriter, and brings them in to the story of fiction. By adding in the end deux ex machina in which Laroche is eaten by an alligator furthers the idea that sometimes life really is a literary piece, and no matter how much ti may evolve, according to Darwinism, is still susceptible to what people like to term fictional.

Analysis of Adaptation:

Jonez stays true to the story line and tone of Orlean’s original, and provides us with a movie that would otherwise not be a good representation of Orchid Thief. Much like Tristram Shandy, Jonez gives the audience a film of a text that is unfilmable. The excerpt it is based on does not provide a story arch- no beginning, no problem to solve, just text description. Jonez, then, adds in a story of his own that mirrors and emphasizes the characters Laroche and Orleans, and plays off of the motifs and ideas presented in the text and perhaps the biographies of Orlean and Laroche, especially those inferred from her tone in describing Laroche.

Research:

1.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUwrIeEB9-Y

in this interview, Susan reveals her concerns for how producers were going to make her story in to a movie, and her concerns for her image in the film. She questions the audience’s interpretation of what they thin kis real of her and what is  fictional in the book, but realizes that it stays true to the spirit of the book. She discusses that she wrote it in a difficult time of life when she was having trouble with her marriage, and is surprised that by reading the book, the producers and script writers were able to interpret that aspect of her, and was able to dissect and see herself, much like the interior tone of the book.

2.) http://www.cinemafunk.com/film-criticism/adaptation-orchid-thief-film-adaptation.html

The article discusses how the novel is actually an adaptation of her original one  time article on the real person John Laroche and his legal battles with Florida, which was then adapted in to the movie.

3.) http://www.pheasnt.demon.co.uk/mudge/cmudge/adaptation.htm

This article explains Charles Kauffman’s journey to creating an adaptation that is not really an adaptation, but a story about Charles himself writing a script  about a woman writing a book, which is the book he is supposed to adapt.

Critical Analysis

In many ways, the line between fantasy and reality is blurred in Adaptation. Give an example or two of this, and make a case about whether this blurring makes the film more, or less, of a cohesive and compelling work of art.

One example of the blurred line between fantasy and reality is Charles’ imagination of what Susan is and should be, his fantasies about her, versus what she really is which is, as he describes in the end, a cheating old lady who is high on crack, abrasive in mannerism. The contrast provides Charles an awakening, which makes the film compelling because as an audience we tend to want to confirm or disprove Charles’ perception of Susan, especially when he gets the chance to almost meet her. The imagination and dreams that Charles has almost tries to convince us that that is what Susan is like, but at the end we see a completely different Susan. Even the audience becoems tricked.

 

 

Aside

The Hours

Analysis of Book

Cunningham’s The Hours focuses on the collective consciousness and how it plays in to writing stories. In his novel he explores the lives of three women in different decades, all of who are writers exploring the the inside of mental stream of consciousness. From the beginning, in the prologue about Woolf’s suicide, it is crafted in a way that shows how the the evaluation of the world remains even at her death, her evaluation of the scenery described by Cunningham. The novel is based heavily on Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, who is Clarissa. The back and forth between time frames, from Clarissa to Brown to Woolf, shows the connection and influence that writers have on each other but more importantly the similarity between writer’s inner workings. Since the novel is based on Woolf’s life and novel, there is a heavy homosexual influence wiith the women, furthering the connection that the three women have with each other despite the time difference. Since the novel focused so heavily on AIDs and the fatality of it in the time periods, the meaning and quickness of life is also explored through the women’s minds.

Analysis of Movie

The film is heavily based on death and homosexuality, prevalent among the three eras played by the three different actresses,  and how they struggle to express their inner thoguhts on those two subjects when they are being suppressed. It is then the exploration of the inner conscience and stream of thought, and how writers and people in general verbalize inwardly events going on. The jumping around in time frames triggers the audience to connect the three lives together and see how death and homosexuality transcend through the decades. By following the three women’s lives, we can see the developmental psyche in which suicide can be thought of at any moment and prompted by random events.

Analysis of Adaptation

The main focus of the adaptation of the film to the novel was the constant exploration of the stream of consciousness and the inner workings of the mind. Whaat it deviated the most in was the focus on homosexuality and the repercussions of it, the fact that it doesn’t end fatally, or at least the worry of death is not as haunting as it was in the novel, perhaps because of the medical advancements of current day medicine. The focus then is moved to how the people interpret with words death and daily life, of love, and how words are used as a tool for freedom. The actresses and actors reflected the tone of the novel, a serious tone, very well. Cinematography did capture scenes that showed a strream of consciousness still flowing.

Online research

1.) http://www.beliefnet.com/Entertainment/Movies/2003/03/The-Search-For-The-Soulful.aspx

In this interview with Moore, author of   and a psychiatrist, he responds to questions probing at the theme of death, both literal and symbolic, responding mostly based on the thought that we all live a ddead life because of the fear of what vitality life has to offer, or can offer. He is intrigued by Laura Brown’s retreat from her too clean and organized life, by her seeking life and death. He talks of the American “dream” and way of life, in which everything is arleady dead- dead fast food, dead boring job, deadening children’s innate abilities by suppressing them through school, and talks of how closely related life and death are, in the aforementioned examples and in Woolf’s suicide. He points out that she stepped in to a stream, water, the giver of life, and how by that hand she died.

2.)http://www.traditioninaction.org/movies/004mrTheHours.htm

Horvat explores ways in which The Hours is a celebration of life and death and howt he closeness of life and death exists everywhere, constantly, even in non-morbid ways.

3.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BetmU0d2K8

Meryl Streep participates in an interview with incredibly deep responses, centering on the idea that these demanding and well-off people who have high expectations of life ask for more and more, which ends up in not having enough and a constant analyzation of life itself that leads to suicide and/or a search for life.

Critical analysis

The following is a question posed by Gabrielle Wenig in her review of The Hours: “What happens when a film about women tries to force us to the conclusion that the thinking woman, or the sensitive woman, or the creative woman’s only or best choice is death?” What is your answer to this question in regards to The Hours and how is this a problem?

This question reminds me of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening in which Edna supposedly drowns herself at the end, like Woolf and like the suicides occuring in the movie. This message seems to criticize the view that women can either die, or be trapped in a marriage to have a “complete” life. Much like Chopin’s book, in which Edna is married but refuses to be identified by her marriage and children and husband, drowns as an alternative. The women in the film, similiarly, ended their lives in order to escape from a norm and suppression and depression caused by love lives. It could be seen as a problem since there is not one but three women being explored, so the quantity, like great amounts of empirical data, seems to speak more to the moridibity of a woman’s existence. However, as aforementioned,  it could work to the advantage of women. These women, creative women, who feel too much who think too much who are imprisoned because of their intellect are suppressed by society. Hence, the movie can be taken as a message to society to free them.

Bride and Prejudice

Analysis of the Book

In Jane Austen’s 19th century novel is written as a satire and criticism of the 19th century marriage contracts of different classes. The atmosphere that marriage created was that of a market, in which wives were traded, essentially, for possessions and husbands claimed in order for the woman to claim more possessions. Intertwined in the marriage criticism is the romantic love story, specifically that between Darcy and Lizzie, which defies the marriage norms in which marriage is created to establish class and possessions. Austen discusses the theme of 19th century coverture, or possession of the woman, in marriage through the mother’s anxiety to marry off her daughters for them to find wealth and escape poverty, only to become property.

Analysis of Movie:

Director Chadha uses the backdrop of India and the musical romantic story style in order to create a film of the battle of the cultures, mostly in terms of marriage. Using the clash of cultures, American, British, and Indian, Chadha demystifies the notion of arranged marriages and shows the flip side of arranged marriages as viewed by the Indians and Americans. The film also shows how Indians who have moved to America, which is where everyone in India seems to want to go except Lalita, view Indians in their home country, specifically regarding marriage and women. Lalita stands as the rejection of the traditional roles of women in marriages and Kholi and her mother stand as the proponents of the shy, softspoken, “marriagable” properties  that women should be.

ANalysis of Adaptation

By recreating the story to fit that of modern day India and America, two countries that seem to have polarized marriage traditions and life styles, Chadha successfully  stays true to the message that Austen presented, which is that of a criticism on a marriage in which the woman becomes chosen, and essentially the man’s property and choice. Though the Mrs. Bakshi represents exactly that, the giving away of women in marriage, Kiran is the version of Lalita if Lalita were snootier and the opposite of Mrs. Bakshi. She represents the woman’s freedom and choice, in her way of dressing (more revealing than Lalita) and in her speech (swear words). She and her brother are both in the gentry class, and are Indian, but reject the Indian traditions when they are back in India. The element of satire and comedy in Pride and Prejudice is in Mr. Kholi, who embodies what the Indian mothers want for their daughters, which is to adopt in to the American society. Though Mrs. Bakshi already lives in a gigantic house, shown in the movie, she still complains about it and wants to move to Hollywood. The musical aspect of the movie makes the story more enjoyable. The book itself is a bit long and probably not so enjoyable to modern day audiences, but with the use of musicals and sing alongs and dances moves, basically things that are aesthetically pleasing, audiences and viewers will be more willing to watch.

Online research:

1.)

http://www.mixedreviews.net/extrahelpings/2005/brideprejudice/brideprejudice.shtml

In this dialogue between Jill Cozzi and Gabriel Shanks, the two discuss how the film by Chandra was not so good because of its limbo between Bollywood and Hollywood, and how CHandra in not of “Bollywood culture” so is unable to bring forth that part. The argument is that the actors are not so good, but also that the film is Bollywood made to be adaptable to the American palette. Their main concern was the singing, which was set in India and incorporated Indian dance but was sung in English, and the political aspect of the movie, in which Chadra seems to project her own political views and advertisement of India being better than America on the character of Lalita. Though it was an attempt and was meant to be a movie showing the merging of cultures, Cozzi and Shanks believe that the movie was not as enjoyable to the American audience or Bollywood as intended.

2. ) http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050210/REVIEWS/502100302/1023

Egbert in this article denounces Bride and Prejudice as Bollywood and classifies it as Hollywood musical comedy inspired and including Bollywood elements, due to its Austen inspired storyline.

3.) http://movies.about.com/od/brideandprejudice/a/bridemh020905.htm

Henderson discusses the appeal of the movie to AMerican audiences and says that it is the upbeat attitude that will draw American viewers in.

Critical Analysis:

Is Bride and Prejudice too entertaining? How does the “feel good” nature of the film distract audiences from more critical issues presented by the film? Or are those critical issues missing? If so, why is this important?

The feel good nature of the film was necessary to lure viewers in to the films more serious moments and to let audiences release and purge their emotions before the scene in which Lakhi gets tricked by Wickham. The critical issues presented by Austen in the original novel, that of marriage and wives as property, are still preserved and presented well to the audience because of the musical and upbeat atmosphere the film provides. The dialogue becomes more engaging and interesting with the upbeat atmosphere, and the fights between the lovers and struggling lovers weigh less on viewers, which lets them step aside and view the dialogue from a distance and analyze it better.